Letter written by Rush P. Cady, lieutenant in the 97th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company K, to his mother of Rome, New York, from Camp of the 97th Reg. N.Y.V. near Fitzhugh Mansion, Virginia, June 8, 1863

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Letter written by Rush P. Cady, lieutenant in the 97th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company K, from Camp of the 97th Reg. N.Y.V. near Fitzhugh Mansion, Virginia, on June 8, 1863, to his mother, Mrs. Daniel Cady (Fidelia W. Palmer), of Rome, New York

Part 1
PAGE IMAGE                                        Camp of the 97th N.Y.V. (97th Regiment, New York)
                                        near Fitzhugh Mansion, Va. (Virginia) (Fitzhugh Mansion, Virginia)
                                                  June 8th 1863.
Dear Mother (Cady, Daniel (Mrs., Fidelia W. Palmer)) (Cady, Fidelia W. (Mrs. Daniel Cady)) :

                              It is some days since
I last wrote you, but I should have
written again sooner, had there been
anything of importance to communicate.

We have been in the “qui vive” for
nearly a week past, expecting to march
at an hours notice.           On Thursday
morning last, before daylight, we were
ordered to strike tents, pack up & be ready
to march immediately.

We did so, waiting till nearly noon, when
the wagons were unloaded & tents again
put up.- Our Reg. (97th Regiment, New York) then went out on
picket & were gone two days.

          On Friday night again we received
orders to be ready to march at daylight
next morning. The farce of Thursday

Part 2
PAGE IMAGE Was re-enacted, with only the dif-
ference that we lounged around,
momently expecting definite orders
to march, & the wagons remaining
loaded till night.

The orders have not yet been coun-
termanded, that I am aware of, but
our daily routine is resumed, & all
goes on as usual.

          On Thursday last pontoon bridges
were thrown across the Rappahannock (Rapphannock River) ,
at the same point where Frank- lin (Franklin) crossed last Dec. (where we crossed)
and one or two Divisions of the 6th Army Corps (6th Army Corps)
(which lay next to us) went over, the remainder of the
Corps stayed upon this side as a
Reserve. There was heavy artillery
firing during the day: the pontoons
were laid with very little opposition,
under cover of our artillery fire,
which was concentrated upon the rebel
rifle pits in that vicinity.

                    There has been considera-

Part 3
PAGE IMAGE ble firing since. What the re-
sult of this movement has been
we do not know. I have no
doubt that the movement was
intended only for a “demonstra-
tion”, so as to take advantage
of any movement the rebels
might have inaugurated, and
also to deter them from anoth-
er raid into Ma. (Massachusetts) (Massachusetts) & Pa. (Pennsylvania) (Pennsylvania)

          All seems quiet now,
but it may be the quiet which pre-
cedes a storm. Battle-clouds rise sud-
denly, and their deadly thunderbolts are
as suddenly launched upon the opposing
combatants.           However we do not often
anticipate the horrors & perils of battle, till
we find ourselves face to face with them. But
we cannot forget our former experiences.

          The weather has been for a day or two, &
is still quite cool, so that flannels are com-
fortable. Gustavus (Palmer, Gustavus M. (Captain)) remains in good health.

Part 4
PAGE IMAGE 4 His papers containing application for admis-
sion into the Invalid Corps (Invalid Corps) were lost at
Brigade Headquarters, so that he had to make
out a new sett (set), which were forwarded
a day or two since. This unforeseen mis-
hap will of course delay him some time
longer.                     My health has not been good,
as I have been troubled with diarrhaea con-
siderable, till I am a good deal reduced
in flesh, but I am in as good spirits as
ever, & hope soon to get the better of so
disagreeable an ailment. I am sure that
the water we use is very unwholesome.

                    That medicine, contained in the Ex.
Package, is an excellent remedy & will
doubtless set me right immediately, when
I get it. I have not yet received any of
the packages (4 in no.) which have been
recently sent. But one of our Sutler (Sutler) 's
aides went to Washington (Washington, District of Columbia) a day or two since
& is now expected back. I think he will bring
two of them, (which Mrs. Mendenhall (Mendenhall (Mrs.)) informed me

Part 5
PAGE IMAGE had come to 447 Pa. Ave.) but if he should
not, Col. Wheelock (Wheelock, Charles (Colonel)) or Lieut. Watters (Watters (Lieutenant)) may,
as they are both now [near] the Reg.
The other two packages were brought to
Acquia Creek (Aquia Creek, Stafford County, Virginia) (being directed to the 2d Div.
1st A.C.) and I shall expect to find them at
Div. Hdqr's, in charge of the Provost Marshal.

                    I am more & more pleased
that I have made application for a po-
sition in a Colored Reg. (Colored Regiment) for the various
reasons which I named in my last letter,
and am quite anxious that my applica-
tion may prove successful. I am still
in doubt as to the view which you & Father (Cady, Daniel)
will take of this matter. Should my health
not improve, I may get a resignation accepted,
at Washington (Washington, District of Columbia) , where I might get a
medical certificate, or perhaps I could enter
the Invalid Corps. But I must close,
with abundant love to all.

The noisy “tattoo” is beating without, & warns
to prepare for bed, or “lights” must “out,” at

                    Your Son,
Rush P. Cady (Cady, Rush Palmer (Lieutenant)) .
Part 6

I am short of envelopes, which accounts
for my using this.
I sent you a glow worm in a little
box this morning. You may never
have seen one: it is very beautiful at

                    I will send this letter to Eliza (Cady, Eliza)
again, as it will be delayed but one
day, & will save my writing another
immediately; in a few days she will be
at home, I presume.

Part: of 6